Eat New Zealand, Now we’re talking!

New Zealand food movement Eat New Zealand held their annual symposium in Wellington on 27th August 2017 in conjunction with Wellington On A Plate. Stone Soup Films set up a video booth to capture the thoughts of those in the audience and on the podium. The conversation continues….

Make every bite count

The connection between bees and food

by Gabrielle Message*

Every piece of food we eat can either embody gratitude towards bees for their efforts, or it can add another metaphorical weight to their backs, according to how it was produced. Decidedly the best way to give thanks to bees is by sourcing or growing food that uses a biological method. Full article “Make every bite count”

A story about doing the best with what you’ve got

by Gina Williams

One of my favourite quotes is from the mouth of the assiduous and generally awe-inspiring Dr Jane Goodall, “The greatest danger to our future is apathy”. My family have been farming on the foothills of a mountain called Maungatautari, in the Waikato for over a century. Today, the land is a medium-sized organic dairy farm and apiary. Full article “A story about doing the best with what you’ve got”

The Food Farm

words & photography by Kate Crockett

When I first stepped foot in Nick and Angela’s kitchen, I felt as though I had stepped into a still life Cézanne painting, only there was nothing contrived about the scene. Everything atop the counter – from the empty jars and the elegant wine bottles, to the food scattered on the cutting board and the lone baguette – told a story of a creation in the making. Full article “The Food Farm”

Cultivate Christchurch

by Brie Sherow
Photos Jade Cavalcante

I first met Fiona Stewart when she and her business partner Bailey Perryman approached me with their idea for an inner-city farm situated on a lot left vacant by earthquake demolition. The organisation that I was working for at the time, Life in Vacant Spaces (LIVS), manages private property on a rolling monthly basis while the landowners work through their future plans. Full article “Cultivate Christchurch”

Tokyo – Train Station Food.

Tokyo is a superlative city by many measures – most populous urban area in the world, biggest metropolitan economy of all the world’s cities, home to the world’s busiest train station – but anyone who’s been to Tokyo knows there are two things the city does particularly well: food, and public transportation, and food in public transportation. Full article “Tokyo – Train Station Food.”

Organics: Radical? Or just good business?

by Nick Loosley

Ben Bostock is curious and infectiously energetic, he can’t sit still and paces as he talks on his phone which rings constantly. He is humble and totally transparent when explaining his work. This is refreshing in an industry that is notorious for keeping secrets, farm gates firmly closed to the media. His knack for keeping things simple and focusing on the crucial elements of his operation have seen Bostock’s Organic Free Range Chicken expand quickly. Ben makes a great farmer. Full article “Organics: Radical? Or just good business?”

Volume 4 – Editorial

Our fourth Volume of Stone Soup sees an evolution. In pursuit of living up to our original intent – to be a truly independent street-level voice looking at our world through the lens of food – we’ve launched a crowdfunding campaign through Wellington startup Press Patron. Our aim is to become a platform that is financially sustained by our reader community. Full article “Volume 4 – Editorial”

An impression of the Fijian sugar cane field worker.

Shortly after shooting for this project, Cyclone Winston – the worst in Fijian recorded history – devastated the region, deepening the struggle in an industry already pushed to its very limits of viability.

Thousands of Fijians still remain without homes, surviving in makeshift shacks and tents.

Contribute here:
oxfam.org.nz/what-we-do/emergencies/cyclone-winston

Directors: Steven Boniface & Blake Dunlop
Producer: Steven Boniface
Editor: Blake Dunlop
Colourists: Images & Sound

Special thanks to Ranu, kava, and the people of Fiji.